Frequently Asked Questions

We believe that knowledge is empowering, and better protection is the key to enjoying an active lifestyle. Take a look through our Frequently Asked Questions for more information on managing incontinence.

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Your digestive system absorbs nutrients from the food and drink you consume, and your kidneys filter your blood, remove the waste and produce urine.

  • As the continuous trickle of urine passes from your kidneys, your bladder slowly expands to hold between 400mL to 620mL.
  • When your bladder is around 75% full, the stretch receptors in its walls send signals along your pelvic nerves to your spinal cord and back, which signals the urge to urinate to your brain.
  • Once you’re there, the brain tells your large bladder muscle to squeeze and contract.
  • At the same time it tells your pelvic floor muscles, surrounding your urethra, to relax and let the urine pass.

The number of times you urinate every day depends on your age, gender, weight, diet and lifestyle, urethra, nerves and pelvic floor muscles. Other influencing factors include whether you are pregnant, have a chronic cough, or have experienced trauma to the bladder.

Most people pass urine about 4 to 6 times during the day, and feel the occasional need to get up and use the bathroom during the night.

What can be done about bladder weakness?

There are health professionals such as continence nurses & physiotherapists that specialise in bladder weakness.

Pelvic floor exercises and bladder retraining methods can also strengthen bladder control. To exercise your pelvic floor muscles, just hold and squeeze them for a second or two. A healthcare professional can guide you with this.

Using these exercises, in conjunction with continence management products, means you can look forward to continuing to live your way of life with confidence. You can request a free sample of TENA products to try here, for men and for women.

There are many lifestyle choices you can make to reduce the likelihood of incontinence such as:

  • Doing pelvic floor excercises
  • Staying hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids
  • Maintaining a balanced, high-fibre diet
  • Being physically active on a regular basis
  • Urinating only when your bladder is full
  • Not rushing bladder and bowel movements
  • Not smoking  

Yes, women most commonly experience two type of incontinence:

  1. Stress Incontinence - Occurs when the bladder unexpectedly leaks due to pressure from physical exertion such as coughing, sneezing, laughing, heavy lifting or exercising. Amounts of leakage tend to be small but there can be larger leakages. This is the most common type of incontinence women experience.
  2. Urge Incontinence – Occurs when the bladder tries to empty despite best efforts to restrain leaking. There is a lack of co-ordination between impulses the brain gives to the bladder and what the bladder does. This can result in quite large losses of urine and increased frequency of urination.

 

Men are also prone to a further two types:

  1. After dribble - losing a few drops after you’ve been to the toilet.
  2. Overflow incontinence - a constant or erratic flow of urine, caused by enlarged prostate, fibroids, prolapse, or neurological conditions.

 

Yes, what you put into your body can affect the way your bladder and the surrounding muscles react. Common triggers for incontinence are stimulants, such as caffeine and alcohol. Spicy and acidic foods can also worsen the situation.

The amount you drink (and when) can also have an impact. There’s no need to restrict your fluid intake, though. Being dehydrated concentrates your urine, which can lead to bladder infections.

There are many lifestyle choices you can make to reduce the likelihood of incontinence**, such as:

  • Doing pelvic floor exercises
  • Staying hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids
  • Maintaining a balanced, high-fibre diet
  • Being physically active on a regular basis
  • Urinating only when your bladder is full
  • Not rushing bladder and bowel movements
  • Not smoking 
  • Not consuming  excessive amounts of alcohol
  • Maintaining a healthy weight

 

Reference: 

*   http://www.continence.org.au/pages/what-is-incontinence.html

** https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au

Yes. While the pelvic floor muscles different for men (the bladder and bowel) and women (the bladder, bowel and uterus) anyone can do Kegel exercises to strengthen them. Find out more about Pelvic Floor Exercises for men 

If incontinence is holding you back, you may wish to speak to a healthcare professional, such as your GP, continence nurse, or physiotherapist. They will be able to help you identify the cause and best course of action.

Yes. You can find our products online for purchase, here.